Misting Houseplants – The Complete Guide

Misting is beneficial for many different types of houseplants, especially plants that are native to tropical areas.

Daily misting using an inexpensive spray bottle can make a big difference to the health of your indoor plants.

In this article I’ll tell which plants benefit from misting as well as the best way to mist your plants to avoid fungal overgrowth.

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misting houseplants

Why mist indoor plants?

Tropical plants originate from areas with high humidity like rainforests, so when they’re grown in a place with dry air they can really struggle to maintain their moisture levels.

The humidity level in rainforest areas is around 88%, while the average home has a humidity level that ranges between 30 to 40%. [1]

Most tropical plants can’t hold a lot of water in their leaves, so they dry out very quickly when humidity is low.

If you notice that the leaves on your houseplants are turning brown, yellow or curling up, they may need more humidity.

Indoor plants that love mist

Plants that benefit from being sprayed with water include air plants, philodendrons, rubber plants, ferns, anthuriums and caladiums.

misting indoor plants

Plants to avoid misting

Misting isn’t beneficial for all plants and it can even cause some plants to rot.

Avoid misting succulents like jade plants, echeveria and aloe vera because they’re native to dry, desert areas and store lots of moisture in their leaves.

Also avoid misting plants with furry or hairy leaves like african violets because the leaves can rot if they’re kept moist.

How often to mist indoor plants

How frequently you need to mist your plants will depend on how dry the air in your home is.

If you’re running heating or cooling for most of the day or night then you’ll need to mist your plants more often.

Check your plants throughout the day and if you notice that the mist is evaporating in an hour to two then you may need to mist a few times during the day.

You can also use a hygrometer (indoor humidity monitor) to check the humidity level inside your home.

How to mist houseplants

  • Fill a spray bottle with tepid (lukewarm) water
  • Use filtered or rain water that doesn’t contain chlorine, fluoride or other chemicals.
  • Adjust the nozzle to the finest mist setting
  • Always mist your plants in the morning so the leaves can dry out during the day.
  • Mist the top and bottom of the leaves and let the water sit on the leaves. Don’t wipe the leaves down.
mist on houseplant leaves

Positioning your houseplants

Placing your tropical indoor plants away from windows, heaters and air-conditioners will help to prevent them from drying out too fast.

Ensure that you have enough space between the plants so that the leaves aren’t touching and the air can circulate around the plants.

Placing your tropical plants in the bathroom can also provide them with much needed humidity.

Misting vs humidifying

Misting will help to prevent your houseplants from drying out, but if the air in your home is very dry from running heating or cooling then you may want to get a small humidifier for your plant room.

Humidifiers help to increase the humidity level in your room to recreate the humid environment that tropical plants love.

It’s best not to run the humidifier all day every day because you may get mold growing on your walls and furniture.

So there are my tips for misting houseplants.

Water spray bottles only cost about a dollar but they can make a big difference to the health of your plants.

With a regular misting schedule your indoor plants will be able to thrive, even if you don’t live in the tropics.

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Do you mist your indoor plants? Let me know why or why not in the comments below.

Are you on Pinterest? I have boards dedicated to Houseplant Care and Indoor Gardens that you may enjoy. You can also find me on Facebook.

mist house plants

Kelly Martin

Hi, I'm Kelly Martin. I'm passionate about gardening and horticulture and I love growing just about everything including herbs, vegetables, flowers, succulents and indoor plants. I've been gardening most of my life and I created this blog to inspire beginner gardeners to create their own urban garden. Read more

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